Racing Drone

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Racing drones at 100 MPH in the Las Vegas Drone Rodeo

We took a break from CES 2017 and headed to the desert just outside the restricted airspace for Las Vegas to try out the "Ferrari of drones," UVify's Draco.



Drone racing: First Person View (FPV)

At an abandoned warehouse in Melbourne's west, about 30 drone racers have spent hours custom building their multi-rotor machines and fitting them with ...



Racing Australia's FASTEST FPV DRONE PILOT - Pilot Showcase

FPV pilot showcase with Australia's fastest racer -Thomas from BMSWEB. Asking Thomas 5 questions about the hobby and then smashing some batteries with ...




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    look how far we've come & ""CONGRESS MAN, YES" & several of the reasons why USURER'S LOGIC makes FACEBOOK the future press darlings of 2018", scott richard image and painting from 2012

    PRESS PLAY i love you, i know yello (1983) an essay that cites TONS of quotes and incidents from the recent congressional meeting regarding FACEBOOK taking over the world and why you should have invested when i...

    Photo by torbakhopper on Flickr

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    Photo by Powhusku on Flickr

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    09/10/18, via

  • Can the Drone Racing Federation Take Flight?

    09/07/18, via The Ringer (blog)

    Thursday unmistakable the start of the Drone Racing League's third season, which will feature 18 racers competing in seven events in locations including the BMW Bruise exhibition center and the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2. By some measures, the league

  • AI drone pilots will ultimatum humans in competition sponsored by Lockheed Martin

    09/05/18, via The Verge

    Drone racing has only been a sympathetic sport for a few years, but artificial intelligence is already gunning to take over. Today, the Drone Racing League (DRL), which is one of the foremost organizations difficult to turn drone racing into the next NASCAR,

  • Drone Racing: The Next Battleground For AI to Try to Lead Humans

    09/07/18, via Futurism

    THE NEXT BATTLEFIELD. Synthetic intelligence (AI) has been gradually kicking human butt in competitions. Now, it will have a new venue in which to (try to) assert its dominance over humanity: drone racing. On Wednesday, VentureBeat reported that the

  • Lockheed and drone racing associated with launch US$2 million competition to develop drone AI

    09/10/18, via Aerospace Testing International

    Lockheed Martin has launched a struggle with the Drone Racing League that asks entrants to design software that will enable a drone to fly autonomously around professional drone racing courses. The autonomous drones teams selected for the

  • WKAF210RTF1 Walkera F210 FPV Racing Quadcopter Drone | eBay
    WKAF210RTF1 Walkera F210 FPV Racing Quadcopter Drone | eBay
  • Pattern GoolRC 210 Racing Drone RC Quadcopter with CC3D ...
    Pattern GoolRC 210 Racing Drone RC Quadcopter with CC3D ...

Can the Drone Racing Coalition Take Flight? - The Ringer (blog)

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to recuperate your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audience is coming from. To distinguish out more or to opt-out, please read our Cookie Policy. In addition, please read our Privacy Policy, which has also been updated and became stuff May 23rd, 2018. By choosing I Accept, you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies. Jordan Temkin is not afraid of heights. For him, the highlight of outcrop climbing is looking down when he’s halfway up a mountain—precisely the part of the experience that would give most people wait. From time to time, he’s broken bones for his hobbies, and once, he broke his face—to be precise, his cheekbone, which he fractured after a failed backflip on skis. “That wasn’t a fun one,” he says. The 27-year-old Temkin, who lives in his hereditary Seattle, still sometimes puts himself in harm’s way in the pursuit of excitement. But in the past few years, he’s found a full-time line of work—or as he calls it, an obsession—that allows him to experience greater heights and faster travel than he has before without breaking any bones or, for that occasion, moving much at all. He races drones, wearing goggles that give him a first-person view (FPV) of the feed from cameras mounted on the swift devices. “There’s very few things that I’ve experienced that are almost a full out-of-body experience,” he says. “Whenever I fly, I’m transplanted into the drone. I’m flying my totality body, my mind is transplanted into this other little machine. ” Better yet, he adds, “I’m only risking a few hundred dollars as contrasted with of my life. Temkin, who uses “Jet” as his esports-style moniker in racing circles, may be risking money when he races drones that he’s built himself in tyro events, but he’s also making more than enough money to cover the occasional crash—and, for the record, he’s totaled only one drone in the almost five years he’s been flying, which he remembers because, he says, “it felt like I had adrift a part of me. ” Temkin is the two-time champion—and, thus far, the only champion—of the Drone Racing League (DRL), which was founded in 2015 and launched its win initially season in 2016. His status as the reigning speed demon of drone racing entitles him to a one-year, $100,000 contract with DRL—a more safely a improved deal than working three non-drone-racing jobs at a time, as he used to do, especially considering the regular rushes of adrenaline that seem to coax him as much as the money (and the lack of medical bills). But Temkin is the top earner in a sport that still doesn’t make successful racers with or support many full-time competitors. Thursday marked the start of the Drone Racing League’s third ready, which will feature 18 racers competing in seven events in locations including the BMW Welt exhibition center and the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2. By some measures, the leagued with is already a success: DRL airs in more than 75 countries, including in 10 episodes on ESPN in North and South America. Its primary two seasons, a league spokesperson says, were watched by a total of more than 55 million viewers worldwide, which gives it a visibility dominance over competitors like MultiGP and DR1 that don’t have. Source: www.theringer.com

AI drone pilots will dare humans in competition sponsored by Lockheed Martin - The Verge

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to renovate your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audience is coming from. To lay one's hands on out more or to opt-out, please read our Cookie Policy. In addition, please read our Privacy Policy, which has also been updated and became true belongings May 23rd, 2018. By choosing I Accept, you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies. Drone racing has only been a human sport for a few years, but counterfeit intelligence is already gunning to take over. Today, the Drone Racing League (DRL), which is one of the foremost organizations trying to turn drone racing into the next NASCAR, announced a new contention for teams to develop AI pilots for its aircraft. With backing from aerospace firm Lockheed Martin, DRL wants to trainee developers from around the world, including students and drone enthusiasts. They’ll have to create an AI that’s capable of flying one of DRL’s standardized quadcopters help of its complex race courses without preprogramming or human supervision. Teams will then compete in the DRL’s upcoming 2019 pep up by racing against one another in the same courses as human pilots as part of the newly designated Artificial Intelligence Robotic Racing (AIRR) lap. Up for grabs is more than $2 million in prizes, with a one-off $200,000 reward for the first AI team to beat a professional humanitarian pilot. Probably not in 2019. A number of institutions are currently developing autonomous pilots for quadcopters, but even the most advanced ones run out of to human pros. (They can certainly trounce amateur pilots, though. Speaking to The Verge over email, Drone Racing League author and CEO Nicholas Horbaczewski said he thought humans would definitely have the advantage for now. “DRL’s pilots could easily defeat any autonomous racing drone today. ” To law this progress, says Horbaczewski, DRL’s champion pilot will race the top-performing AI team at the end of each season. “In 2019, my cabbage is on the human pilot,” he says. “But by 2020. It’s anyone’s race. Some observers may be raising their eyebrows at the involvement of a firm like Lockheed Martin in this think up. After all, Lockheed is one of the world’s biggest manufacturers of military arms, and AI-controlled quadcopters have long been identified as one of the weapons of the tomorrow. AI drones could be used for surveillance and even offensive purposes, and many fear that the involvement of artificial intelligence could broach to mistakes on the battlefield. ISIS already uses modified commercial quadcopters to drop bombs on the Iraqi army (though there’s no token these drones are steered by AI). Horbaczewski explained that DRL partnered with Lockheed because the company is an “absolute leader in AI and autonomous bevy of quail. ” He stressed that the new AIRR circuit “has no ties to the military” and that “no Lockheed Martin IP or hardware will be used. ” He added that autonomous away technology has many potential benefits in domains as varied as firefighting and space exploration. “To suggest that advancing AI piloting would be intrinsically linked to the military would be terribly short-sighted,” said Horbaczewski,. Source: www.theverge.com

Drone Racing: The Next Battleground For AI to Try to Upper hand over Humans - Futurism

Phoney intelligence (AI) has been gradually kicking human butt in competitions. Now, it will have a new venue in which to (try to) assert its dominance over humanity: drone racing. On Wednesday, VentureBeat reported that the Drone Racing Collaborating with (DRL) plans to launch the Artificial Intelligence Robotic Racing (AIRR) Circuit, a series of competitions between autonomous drones and their defenceless-piloted counterparts. In 2019, autonomous drones — ones capable of navigating complex courses without any supervision from humans or preprogramming — will fight against one another in four races, DRL CEO Nicholas Horbaczewski told VentureBeat via an email. The team responsible for the winning drone will greet $1 million prize provided by Lockheed Martin. At the end of the AIRR season, the winning autonomous drone will hurry against the 2019 DRL champion. If it wins, the team receives another $250,000, but Horbaczewski doesn’t think that’s likely. “In 2019, we’re sufficiently certain the human pilot will win. By 2020, it’s anyone’s race,” he told VentureBeat. If a human pilot does come out on top, that $250,000 jackpot rolls over into the following season, and with that much money on the line, it’s seeming only a matter of time before we add “drone racing” to the list of competitions in which we just can’t keep up with AI. Comprehend MORE: Drone Racing League Launches $2 Million Autonomous Drone Competition [ VentureBeat ]. More on AI vs. humans: AI Couldn’t Rout a Team of Professional Gamers at DOTA 2, but It Held Its Own. Source: futurism.com
  • Delfts MAVLab wereldkampioen in AI autonome drone-nation 2019

    12/11/19, via engineersonline.nl

    Hidebound uitdaging De professionele dronerace-organisatie Drone Racing League (DRL) stelde drone-ontwikkelaars daarom voor een intense uitdaging: probeer een autonome drone een raceparcours sneller af te laten leggen dan een menselijke dronerace-piloot.

  • Mobiliteit centraal thema League.frl 2019

    12/06/19, via Emerce

    De drones die het bedrijf van keynote demagogue Mark Woortmeijer ... Of dat het data science team van TKP Pensioen het Top Dutch Solar Racing troupe hielp bij het bepalen van hun strategie voor de zonnerace in Australië? Hoeksma: “Als student denk je ...